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Aerial Photo of Facility
Supporting Wildlife
Protecting Our Natural Resources
Conservation is Key
Water the Stuff of Life

Our Mission

At South Valley Water Reclamation Facility, we are tasked with treating wastewater 24 hours a day seven days a week 365 days a year.  We currently treat approximatley 20 million gallons of water a day.  The water discharged from this facility goes into the Jordan River and must be of a quality to meet the requirements of our NPDES permit. 

Treatment Process

Any water which you put down your sink, drain or toilet comes to our facility where the "dirty" water is treated to remove the contamination before the water is returned to the environment.  This is basically a three step process ... Learn more...

Conservation Tips

There are a number of easy ways to save water, and they all start with you. When you save water, you save money on your utility bills. Here are just a few ways... Learn more...

Recent News

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Pretreatment Technician Trainee

South Valley Water Reclamation Facility is accepting applications for a Pretreatment Technician Trainee. This position monitors commerical and industrial users, inspects permitted commercial users, maintains current, accurate, and complete related records and files, develop and maintain positive working relationships with business owners, architects, engineers, and developers during inspections.

Applicant must be a high school graduate or equivalent, must maintain a valid Utah driver's license and must obtain a Grade 1 wastewater certificate within 18 months from date of employment.

This is a fulltime position with benefits. Annual Salary: $31,767. Physical/Drug testing is required....

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50 Inches of Rain

50 Inches of Rain

Hurricane Harvey, now downgraded to tropical depression Harvey, dumped 50 inches of rain on parts of the Texas coast this week. This epic storm has wreaked havoc on a large swath of the southwest and left destruction and devastation in its wake. When a large low pressure system moving in from the sea runs smack dab into a high pressure system over the coast, it’s a recipe for a natural disaster. Counter-clockwise circulating air vacuums up moisture from the Gulf, and all that warm, moist air rising up must eventually come down. And come down it did. “Harvey came inland about 200 miles south of Houston, and the outer rain bands pushed into Houston on Saturday. . . Houston lies a few dozen feet above sea level, and during normal rainfall residential yards drain into streets, streets drain into bayous, and bayous carry water into Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.

But this was not normal rainfall; it was extreme tropical rainfall. Meteorologists measure rainfall rates in inches per hour at a given location. A rainfall rate of 0.5 inches per hour is heavy, while anything above 2.0 inches per hour is intense (you'd probably stop your car on a highway, pull over, and wait out the passing storm). [In the Houston area], from 11pm to 1am that night, 10.6 inches of rain fell, about as much rainfall as New York City gets from October through December. That happened in two hours.   Ars Technica

 

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